Long-Term Unemployment

The HCI long-term unemployment indicator measures the proportion of the working population (i.e., residents above age 16) who have been unemployed for more than 12 months. While unemployment itself has an effect on health, long-term unemployment has been shown to have a severe impact. Long durations of unemployment are linked to greater risk of suicide and suicide attempts. Long-term unemployment is considered an “inverse” measure, i.e., the higher the value the more negative the ranking. In addition to its connections to Employment, long-term unemployment also impacts economic health, neighborhood characteristics, education, and housing.

Neighborhoodsort descending Indicator Value Rank
Blackstone 3.9% 1
Charles 6.9% 10
College Hill 27.4% 25
Downtown 13.4% 24
Elmhurst 10.7% 20
Elmwood 6.0% 7
Federal Hill 8.4% 15
Fox Point 4.9% 3
Hartford 5.4% 5
Hope 3.9% 1
Lower South Providence 7.4% 12
Manton 9.5% 17
Mount Hope 6.5% 9
Mount Pleasant 11.1% 22
Olneyville 11.9% 23
Reservoir 8.3% 14
Silver Lake 10.0% 19
Smith Hill 5.2% 4
South Elmwood 9.6% 18
Upper South Providence 5.7% 6
Valley 8.1% 13
Wanskuck 9.0% 16
Washington Park 10.9% 21
Wayland 6.2% 8
West End 6.9% 10

Key Citations:
1. Katz, Lawrence F. Testimony for the Joint Economic Committee, U.S. Congress. Long-Term Unemployment in the Great Recession, Hearing, April 29, 2010. Available at http://scholar.harvard.edu/files/lkatz/files/long_term_unemployment_in_t...
2. Sullivan, Daniel and Till von Wachter, 2009 (as cited in Katz, Lawrence F., 2010).
3. Milner, Allison, Andrew Page, Anthony D. LaMontagne. “Long-Term Unemployment and Suicide: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis” (2012). PLoS ONE