Employment Rate

The HCI Employment Rate indicator measures the proportion of working age population (i.e., residents aged 16 through 64) currently employed. Research demonstrates a strong connection between employment status and health. Compared to the unemployed, employed people are more likely to have better physical well-being and self-esteem, and a lower likelihood of mortality and psychological problems, such as distress, depression, and anxiety. Re-employment after a long period of unemployment is also associated with improved mental health. Although found in the Employment Opportunities domain, employment rate also influences, or is influenced by, housing, economic health and educational opportunities. Employment rate data is available from the U.S. Census.

Neighborhoodsort descending Indicator Value Rank
Blackstone 66.2% 3
Charles 55.8% 11
College Hill 46.4% 24
Downtown 43.6% 25
Elmhurst 55.0% 13
Elmwood 48.9% 21
Federal Hill 59.9% 6
Fox Point 64.8% 4
Hartford 50.3% 20
Hope 77.5% 1
Lower South Providence 48.3% 22
Manton 51.1% 18
Mount Hope 53.8% 17
Mount Pleasant 60.1% 5
Olneyville 50.8% 19
Reservoir 57.4% 7
Silver Lake 54.7% 14
Smith Hill 57.1% 9
South Elmwood 57.4% 7
Upper South Providence 46.6% 23
Valley 56.9% 10
Wanskuck 54.3% 15
Washington Park 55.7% 12
Wayland 66.8% 2
West End 53.9% 16

Key Citations:
1. An, Jane, et al. “Issue Brief #9 Exploring the Social Determinants of Health; Work, Workplaces and Health” (2011). Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
2. McKee-Ryan, Frances, et al. “Psychological and physical well-being during unemployment (2005). Journal of Applied Psychology.
3. Morris, J.K., et al. “Loss of employment and mortality” (1994). British Medical Journal.
4. Paul, Karsten I. and Klaus Moser. “Unemployment impairs mental health: Meta-analyses” (2009). Journal of Vocational Behavior.
5. Virtanen, Marianna, et al. “Temporary employment and health: a review” (2005). International Journal of Epidemiology.